Editor, Proof—reader,  please !  Pay attention to details.

 
CriminalRepurcussions
 
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CriminalRepurcussions
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01 March 2016 22:16
 

An author of the experience and standing of Anthony Horowitz, who did a marvellous job in setting this story back in the 1950s and who thankfully did NOT let it ramble like a MidsomerMurders story.
      Congratulations to the author,  bloody well done !  You’ve somehow made Bond books easier to read because of the relaxed but no-nonsense style.    I hope you continue with Bond fantasy stories, formulaic though they may be, predictible as they are, loved because of those reasons and because they are always fun - we would never miss a Bond movie.     
      I applaud the idea of going back in time,  much like “Endeavour” has become the young Morse, about how Morse became Morse, and Benjamin Black’s “The Black Eyed Blonde’, where he out-Chandlered Raymond Chandler,  it’s a terrific thing to be doing. 
      Of course there is only one face I can imagine when reading it, Connery -  of course !  More, please?

 
 
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bnmjeff
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21 July 2016 14:52
 

FYI, “signally” is correct according to the Cambridge dictionary….

 
CriminalRepurcussions
 
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CriminalRepurcussions
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21 July 2016 23:08
 

Thanks, always happy to learn.  I’ve adjusted my comments.

  .......FYI, the Oxford Dictionary online wasn’t showing “signally” when I checked.  ........

 
 
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bnmjeff
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22 July 2016 02:51
 

wasn’t trying to be a “troll”....
Pleased to see someone who enjoys words as I do….
I was tripped up on that word as well and ran to the computer to question it….
always fun to learn a new word, isn’t it!!

 
CriminalRepurcussions
 
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CriminalRepurcussions
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22 July 2016 03:05
 

Easy for me to assume it was a typo or a proof-readers mistake for “singularly”.  I loved your comment!  Yes, always good to learn new words.
Friend of ours has a word for the month, always multisyllabilic (there’s one !).
    In the current era of young people in this electronic device and computer age relying on (American) spellcheck instead of being taught self-reliant spelling and comprehension (which is even more important), they drone in monotones of speech without punctuating, running syllables and words together in the back of their throat and burble burble burble….name a young American actor who doesn’t mumble & burble and not know how to project his voice (like a stage actor is taught)....my favourite example.  How about Owen Wilson the great burbler who chews words,  Matthew McConnachey who draaaaaawls his mumbles out and Woody Harrelson, together in True Detective they were laughably inaudible (but they produced the dismal show to give themselves the work). 
I was always taught that the Oxford English Dictionary is the most high.  And I don’t switch spellcheck on, but my fingers are faster than my brain and mouth if you can believe that,  I was a court stenographer and speed typist ... we were trained to type the transcript out and proof-read later, and my fingers can be dyslectic at times.
Thanks,  good to hear from you.